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Showing posts with the label Best Practices

Step by step migration of ASP.NET Core 2.2 to 3.1

In order to upgrade/migrate asp.net core version to 3.1 following steps to be perform.
Download and install Visual Studio 2019 version 16.4 or higher.Download and install .NET Core 3.1  https://dotnet.microsoft.com/download/dotnet-core/3.1Upgrade the projects of solution to .NET Core 3.1 , because ASP.NET Core 3.1 requires it.Update existing Nuget packages to a version compatible with ASP.NET Core 3.1 in each projectUse IHost interface from a IHostBuilder instead of building and running a IWebHost from a IWebHostBuilder in Program.cs public static IHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) => Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args) .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder => { webBuilder.UseKestrel() .UseSerilog() .UseStartup<Startup>(); }) Change AddMvc method has been replaced by AddControllers in Startup.cs of each projects.In Startup.cs,UseMvc method to be replaced by…

writing clean code matters for better maintenance of application

Clean code — a term first coined by Robert C. Martin in his book 'Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile craftmanship' — is very relevant in today's fast-paced, highly complex software development and lifecycle management environments. It makes it easier to evolve or maintain a finished product. Compare it, if you will, to the work of an electrician; a cabinet of tidy wires and connectors, all clearly organized and labeled, will make future changes that much easier and faster, with fewer risks of error and maybe even reduced costs over time.

Part of clean code is also being considerate of others. Writing code that everyone understands, that the developer is confident is error-free and supported by clear documentation is being respectful of other team members. 'Do as you would be done by' is an applicable motto here; code that breaks once beyond the experimentation stage is likely to annoy colleagues, be embarrassing for the developer and even damage his or her reputation.